metinseven:

Orbitals.

metinseven:

Orbitals.

andromeda1023:

astro-feminist:

Kennedy Space Center

(via
TumbleOn
)
scinote:

To Infinity and Beyond

Boeing and SpaceX have both been awarded contracts by NASA to fly astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS). Ever since NASA retired its space shuttle fleet in 2011, it has been relying on the Russian Soyuz capsule to fly astronauts to the ISS, an arrangement that was meant to be temporary until NASA’s chosen commercial partners under the Commercial Crew Development Project could supply it with a private spacecraft.
Well, with the strained US-Russia relations in recent months, the timing couldn’t have been better! Boeing is a well-known Chicago-based aerospace company known for its commercial and military aircraft. On the other hand, Hawthorne-based SpaceX is a startup run by Paypal cofounder and visionary Elon Musk.
This new development is very significant as it could be the beginning of a new era in space exploration. Until recently, only governments could afford to build and fly spacecraft, but now, private companies are starting to get in on some of the action. In fact, SpaceX has actually already made history before. In 2012, the very year after the shuttles retired, SpaceX became the first private company to launch a spacecraft to dock with the ISS.
With private companies now able to send astronauts and cargo to low-earth orbit destinations like the ISS for relatively low cost, NASA and other government agencies will be able to put more funding into more ambitious exploration missions to uncover even more about our universe.
To read more about the contracts, click on this link.

Submitted by Aram H., Discoverer.
Edited by Peggy K. 

scinote:

To Infinity and Beyond

Boeing and SpaceX have both been awarded contracts by NASA to fly astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS). Ever since NASA retired its space shuttle fleet in 2011, it has been relying on the Russian Soyuz capsule to fly astronauts to the ISS, an arrangement that was meant to be temporary until NASA’s chosen commercial partners under the Commercial Crew Development Project could supply it with a private spacecraft.

Well, with the strained US-Russia relations in recent months, the timing couldn’t have been better! Boeing is a well-known Chicago-based aerospace company known for its commercial and military aircraft. On the other hand, Hawthorne-based SpaceX is a startup run by Paypal cofounder and visionary Elon Musk.

This new development is very significant as it could be the beginning of a new era in space exploration. Until recently, only governments could afford to build and fly spacecraft, but now, private companies are starting to get in on some of the action. In fact, SpaceX has actually already made history before. In 2012, the very year after the shuttles retired, SpaceX became the first private company to launch a spacecraft to dock with the ISS.

With private companies now able to send astronauts and cargo to low-earth orbit destinations like the ISS for relatively low cost, NASA and other government agencies will be able to put more funding into more ambitious exploration missions to uncover even more about our universe.

To read more about the contracts, click on this link.

Submitted by Aram H., Discoverer.

Edited by Peggy K. 

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Earth is not the only planet in our solar system with auroras. As the solar wind—a stream of rarefied plasma from our sun—blows through the solar system, it interacts with the magnetic fields of other planets as well as our own. Saturn’s magnetic field second only to Jupiter’s in strength. This strong magnetosphere deflects many of the solar wind’s energetic particles, but, as on Earth, some of the particles get drawn in along Saturn’s magnetic field lines. These lines converge at the poles, where the high-energy particles interact with the gases in the upper reaches of Saturn’s atmosphere. As a result, Saturn, like Earth, has impressive and colorful light displays around its poles. (Image credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser & L. Calçada, source video; via spaceplasma)

sci-universe:

My recent favourite.

sci-universe:

My recent favourite.

A message from ir1d3bikes


Have you watched all of Cosmos: A space time odyssey? It's on Netflix! I think I've watched ever episode at least 3 times, lol.

Hell ya! I love it. 

You should check out When We Left Earth if it’s still on Netflix.

The Known Universe from AMNH on Vimeo.

exploratorium:

The Known Universe by the American Museum of Natural History. This video will take you on a journey to the end of time and space as we know it.

"Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History.” 

Stars

scinote:

Question:
If black holes are singularities, what do people mean when they refer to a small, medium, or large black hole?
Asked by anonymous

Answer:
 A singularity is a rip in space-time, and this “rip” is the very center point of a black hole. This point is so small that it actually has no volume. If we define size in terms of volume, or the amount of space occupied, singularities don’t vary in size, because all of them contain no volume.
Although singularities don’t contain any volume, they contain all the mass of the black hole. If we do a quick math calculation, in which we use the fact that density = (mass) / (volume), we find that black holes have infinite density.


If someone were to throw you into a black hole, you would first pass the event horizon: the point of no return, the point where the gravity of the singularity doesn’t allow anything to escape. Assuming you’re going in feet-first, your feet and legs, hitting the horizon first and being pulled into the singularity, would be stretched and stretched. The rest of your body would follow suit, and you would turn into something akin to spaghetti. The official term for this process is “spaghettification”— we kid you not. You would probably already be dead at this point, but if you weren’t, you would get to experience falling into the singularity and getting all your mass squeezed into a space with no volume. The singularity would assimilate your mass and you would become part of it.
Now, the size of the black hole itself is quantified by the radius, or distance from the singularity to the event horizon. This distance can range from a tenth of a millimeter to more than 400 times the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Keep in mind that light, the fastest thing in the universe, takes 8 minutes to make that journey from the Sun to the Earth.
Generally speaking, the radius of the black hole is correlated to the mass of its singularity. The mass of a singularity can vary from the mass of the moon to the mass of our sun, multiplied by 10 to the 10th power. We refer to the black holes at the top of this range as supermassive black holes, and their mass usually lies between 198,900,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 and 19,890,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 kilogrammes. In fact, these numbers are so large that there is actually no standard unit prefix for this amount of mass.
To read more, check out this article about the different sizes and types of black holes.

Answered by Deiter H., Expert Leader.
Edited by Jamie V.

scinote:

Question:

If black holes are singularities, what do people mean when they refer to a small, medium, or large black hole?

Asked by anonymous

Answer:

 A singularity is a rip in space-time, and this “rip” is the very center point of a black hole. This point is so small that it actually has no volume. If we define size in terms of volume, or the amount of space occupied, singularities don’t vary in size, because all of them contain no volume.

Although singularities don’t contain any volume, they contain all the mass of the black hole. If we do a quick math calculation, in which we use the fact that density = (mass) / (volume), we find that black holes have infinite density.

If someone were to throw you into a black hole, you would first pass the event horizon: the point of no return, the point where the gravity of the singularity doesn’t allow anything to escape. Assuming you’re going in feet-first, your feet and legs, hitting the horizon first and being pulled into the singularity, would be stretched and stretched. The rest of your body would follow suit, and you would turn into something akin to spaghetti. The official term for this process is “spaghettification”— we kid you not. You would probably already be dead at this point, but if you weren’t, you would get to experience falling into the singularity and getting all your mass squeezed into a space with no volume. The singularity would assimilate your mass and you would become part of it.

Now, the size of the black hole itself is quantified by the radius, or distance from the singularity to the event horizon. This distance can range from a tenth of a millimeter to more than 400 times the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Keep in mind that light, the fastest thing in the universe, takes 8 minutes to make that journey from the Sun to the Earth.

Generally speaking, the radius of the black hole is correlated to the mass of its singularity. The mass of a singularity can vary from the mass of the moon to the mass of our sun, multiplied by 10 to the 10th power. We refer to the black holes at the top of this range as supermassive black holes, and their mass usually lies between 198,900,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 and 19,890,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 kilogrammes. In fact, these numbers are so large that there is actually no standard unit prefix for this amount of mass.

To read more, check out this article about the different sizes and types of black holes.

Answered by Deiter H., Expert Leader.

Edited by Jamie V.

christinetheastrophysicist:

Venus’ Interesting Magnetic Structure

Venus may be similar to Earth in size and mass, but there are differences between the two planets. One difference is the magnetic field. On Venus, a magnetic field isn’t generated by the planet, like Earth’s. It is actually an induced magnetosphere, a region of charged particles around the planet formed by a reaction between Venus’ ionosphere and the solar wind. New research shows that there are holes void of magnetically charged plasma in a region where such plasma is expected to be.

The holes were first noticed when the Pioneer Venus Orbiter moved around the backside of the planet back in 1978. Since then, the holes have not been detected again.

Recently, researchers studying data from the Venus Express orbiter decided to look for the holes again. They found them and realized that they were more common than initially thought, visible over a broad range of solar activity.

When the solar wind hits Venus, it wraps around the planet and a long tail extends behind it. This is what creates the magnetosphere. The Venus Express orbiter took measurements of the magnetic field strength and found variations that indicated the presence of these holes. The observations suggest that these holes are actually not just holes, but take the shape of long cylinders directed out towards space.

But what is causing these cylinders to form? In addition to the solar wind wrapping around the planet to create the magnetosphere, the researchers propose that the magnetic field lines from the solar wind is able to continue into the planet and wrap around its core, something that is also seen on the Moon. As a result, the electrically charged plasma is pushed to the sides and this is what created the two cylinders found behind the planet by the orbiters.

More information can been seen in the NASA video above, the press release, and the journal paper (paywall).

To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

antikythera-astronomy:

It’s called Hat-P-11b. Here are some of its traits:

  • It reaches temperatures of up to 1,120˚ F
  • It’s 17 the mass of Earth (meaning you’d weigh 17 times more there than you do here [presuming you’re reading this from Earth])
  • It’s about four times the radius of Earth (Neptune-sized)