thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

ri-science:

On the 29th August 1831 Michael Faraday achieved one of his greatest successes, discovering how to make electricity from magnetism.

Faraday’s first ‘Electromagnetic Induction Ring' is made from 2 sections of wire insulated with cotton and then coiled around opposite sides of an iron ring. When Faraday passed an electric current through one coil he induced an electric current in the other coil, which flowed for a very brief period of time and caused the needle on a galvanometer to move.

He wrote in his scientific notebook:

Aug 29th 1831 

1. Expts on the production of Electricity from Magnetism, etc. etc.

2. Have had an iron ring made (soft iron), iron round and 7/8 inches thick and ring 6 inches in external diameter. Wound many coils of copper wire round one half, the coils being separated by twine and calico – there were 3 lengths of wire each about 24 feet long and they could be connected as one length or used as separate lengths. By trial with a trough each was insulated from the other. Will call this side of the ring A. On the other side but separated by an interval was wound wire in two pieces together amounting to about 60 feet in length, the direction being as with the former coils; this side call B.

3. Charged a battery of 10 pr. plates 4 inches square. Made the coil on B side one coil and connected its extremities by a copper wire passing to a distance and just over a magnetic needle (3 feet from iron ring). Then connected the ends of one of the pieces on A side with battery; immediately a sensible effect on needle. It oscillated and settled at last in original position. On breaking connection of A side with Battery again a disturbance of the needle.

4. Made all the wires on A side one coil and sent current from battery through the whole. Effect on needle much stronger than before.

5. The effect on the needle then but a very small part of that which the wire communicating directly with the battery could produce.

From this experiment Faraday would go on to develop the first ever generator a few months later.

Faraday’s Ring and scientific notebook can be found within the museum and archival collections of the Ri.

jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.

Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.

(GIFs by framesandflames)

sagansense:

The above video is important. Important to the human civilization, to NASA, and to the many generations ahead who can now only witness Space Shuttle Discovery’s grace and beauty through historic recordings from YouTube, the NASA archives, and her final resting place inside the Smithsonian Uvar-Hazy Air & Space Museum (@airandspace) in Chantilly, VA.

imageApril 19th, 2012. “Discovery Day” @airandspace

Also of importance is what this video - more specifically, this day, "Discovery Day" - means to me, personally. I’ve never had the privilege of witnessing a live shuttle launch, or launch of anything, for that matter. However, I was present on the day Discovery was inducted into the aeronautics archive at the museum to witness the event and all of the illustrious crew of astronauts who’d ever flown aboard her, among thousands of people on a random Thursday: April 19th, 2012.

imageToday marks the anniversary of Discovery’s maiden voyage.

On August 30th, 1984, NASA’s Space Shuttle Discovery - the 3rd to join the fleet - first launched on a mission to deploy 3 communications satellites and test an experimental solar array wing. Since her debut voyage to space, Discovery became recognized as NASA’s longest-serving orbiter, flying 39 times between 1984 - 2011 (more missions than any in the NASA arsenal) with other 365 days in space. Between 1981-2011, Discovery became a true representative of what the human spaceflight program meant for generations ahead, flying every type of mission capable:

+ Satellite delivery and retrieval, Department of Defense, scientific, Hubble Space Telescope, Mir, and space station assembly, crew exchange, and resupply missions
+ Three Hubble Space Telescope missions: deployment (1990) servicing (1997, 1999)
+ Highest crew count: 251
+ First non-astronaut to fly on space shuttle, Charles Walker (1984)
+ Flown aboard Discovery: Sen. Jake Garn (1985) and Sen. John Glenn (1998)
+ Served as Return-to-Flight vehicle after Challenger and Columbia tragedies (1988, 2005)
+ Flown by first African American commander, Frederick Gregory (1989)
+ Piloted by first female spacecraft pilot, Eileen Collins (1995), and by Pamela Melroy on her first flight as pilot (2000)
+ Flew 100th shuttle mission (2000)
+ Flown by both women commanders, Eileen Collins (2005) and Pamela Melroy (2006)
+ Made first visit to Mir, rendezvous without docking (1995)
+ Made final docking visit to Mir space station (1998)
+ Made first docking with International Space Station (1999)
+ Delivered trusses, Harmony node, Kibo laboratory module, Robonaut2, Leonardo module, and tons of supplies to International Space Station (1999-2011)

imageFebruary 24, 2011; Space Shuttle Discovery’s last liftoff.

Discovery did more than just fly crew, cargo, science experiments, and one robotic astronaut (Robonaut2) up into space and aboard the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Discovery was a landmark for NASA’s human spaceflight program. After the loss of shuttles Columbia and Challenger, Discovery was the first to put NASA astronauts back to work so to speak, by being the first to launch after these tragic events which rocked the world and reminded us of not only our human fallibility, but the reality that we were truly on a mission to explore new frontiers, and it was - and continues - to be an area of exploration we cannot embark on lightly. Watch here as Discovery’s final crew members individually pay their respects and adoration to the shuttle while aboard her during the final (39th) mission, STS-133.

imageimageAlong with carrying 251 astronauts (accompanying her list of notable achievements), Discovery delivered to space one of humankind’s most fantastic technological and engineering feats: the Hubble Space Telescope.

It’s only fitting that the space shuttle we celebrate today is aptly named ‘Discovery’, because what she gave us fueled our curiosity toward further discovery beyond the space shuttle and the space telescope’s lifetimes…

imageSaturn from 1996 - 2000. [x]

imageNGC 2818 planetary nebula. [x]

imageRose of galaxies [x]

On “Discovery Day” in 2012 at Smithsonian’s Udvar-Hazy Center for Air & Space, Space Shuttle Discovery and the NASA personnel present to communicate all the exciting goings on through NASA and JPL - especially regarding the approaching the landing of their Mars Science Laboratory “Curiosity” which was currently en route to the red planet - Discovery took us all on one last voyage. She brought space back down to Earth, and reminded us all of what we’ve accomplished, how far we’ve come together as a consortium of intelligent life on this planet, and the transition we’ve begun as a spacefaring civilization.

Space Shuttle Discovery - along with its retired sibling shuttles which were in the process of being transferred to their respective addresses - delivered one final payload: a cargo of dreams and hopes sparked within me to take part in communicating the importance of staying curious, asking questions, and exploring, always; for my son, his generation, and generations of human beings forward.

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageThese photos bring tears to my eyes. Seeing so much passion amongst all those who attended that day reinforced my hope for humankind and reminded me of how curious we still are. “We began as wanderers, and we are wanderers still." Yes. That we are, Carl.

Discovery is not simply a reminder of the power of human ingenuity to solve great problems. It is a challenge to heed the wisdom of Apollo 8 Commander Frank Borman who observed, exploration is really the essence of the American human spirit. Let Discovery rekindle that spirit so we remember what we did before and that we can do again.
— G. Wayne Clough (Secretary, Smithsonian)

Today Discovery takes on a new mission. Less dynamic perhaps, but nonetheless important. It will be on display not only as a testament to events of our time, but also as an inspiration to future generations.
— Sen. John H. Glenn, Jr. (Former NASA/Discovery Astronaut; First American to orbit Earth)

I paid a recent visit to Discovery this year. See why, HERE and browse the archive of my related Discovery posts.

Ad astra per aspera.

nasahistory:

Saturn V

nasahistory:

Saturn V

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Astronomical Particle Colliders That Put Our Own to Shame
When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) began operations, a small but noisy group of people tried to stop it out of fear. Their reasoning: The energies produced as protons slammed into each other at close to the speed of light would be sufficiently high to create miniature black holes or other exotic, destructive things. The fruits of human curiosity would be the literal end of the world.
Those fears were unwarranted for a simple reason: Earth is bombarded by much higher-energy particles all the time, and we haven’t been eaten by a planet-munching black hole yet. In fact, the universe has many naturally-occurring particle accelerators that are far more powerful than the LHC, exceeding even anything we could build in the foreseeable future. Anything exotic we can create in our labs, the cosmos has beaten us to it.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Astronomical Particle Colliders That Put Our Own to Shame

When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) began operations, a small but noisy group of people tried to stop it out of fear. Their reasoning: The energies produced as protons slammed into each other at close to the speed of light would be sufficiently high to create miniature black holes or other exotic, destructive things. The fruits of human curiosity would be the literal end of the world.

Those fears were unwarranted for a simple reason: Earth is bombarded by much higher-energy particles all the time, and we haven’t been eaten by a planet-munching black hole yet. In fact, the universe has many naturally-occurring particle accelerators that are far more powerful than the LHC, exceeding even anything we could build in the foreseeable future. Anything exotic we can create in our labs, the cosmos has beaten us to it.

Continue Reading

child-of-thecosmos:

The Pale Blue Dot (Full video)

child-of-thecosmos:

The Pale Blue Dot (Full video)

theuniverseatlarge:

image

image

Messier 46 - Open Cluster in Puppis

Discovered and catalogued by the French comet-hunter Charles Messier in 1771, M46 is a “very bright, very rich, [and] very large” open cluster. An open cluster forms from a single molecular cloud, which is essentially a massive collection…

spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Discovery, with visible “Teardrop”

spaceexp:

Space Shuttle Discovery, with visible “Teardrop”

antikythera-astronomy:

Some great news

We’ve just gotten word from NASA that they won’t be cancelling the seven missions that were up for review this year. Thank goodness.

Amongst the seven missions in danger were the Mars Curiosity Rover and the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan.

It’s looking like the Curiosity rover will get to continue blasting rocks apart with lasers and searching for signs of life and useful materials in preparation for human astronauts in twenty or so years.

The Cassini probe will get to continue zipping around Saturn and Titan doing science on the ringed planet.

( dcfcloverforever, you’re absofruitly right! Thanks, I changed it :D )

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Sombrero Galaxy The Sombrero Galaxy is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light-years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk.  Distance to Earth: 29,350,000 light years
Credit: NASA/Hubble

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Sombrero Galaxy
The Sombrero Galaxy is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light-years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk.
Distance to Earth: 29,350,000 light years

Credit: NASA/Hubble

humanoidhistory:

The International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour, flying at an altitude of approximately 220 miles above the Earth, May 23, 2011. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

The International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour, flying at an altitude of approximately 220 miles above the Earth, May 23, 2011. (NASA)

kaiyves:

(x)

kaiyves:

(x)